Express Online Training

Sign Up | Forgot your password?

What are some of the key facts about gambling in Australia?

Your RSG (Responsible Service of Gambling) course will teach you to deal with gambling-related incidents, provide a responsible gaming environment, assist customers to gamble within their limits, and help those who may have a gambling problem. As a professional in this industry it’s important you understand some of the key facts about gambling in Australia.

As an employee in the gaming and betting industry, it is your responsibility to enforce the RSG legislation. You will come across a wide range of scenarios within your place of employment, and you will be required to make judgment calls and provide assistance where appropriate. Before entering into the profession, or to keep abreast of the changing landscape, it’s important to understand what gambling in Australia really means.

What does gambling in Australia look like?

Gambling takes on many different forms, both online and offline. The more popular forms of gambling in Australia include electronic gaming machines (pokies), casino based games such as poker and roulette, lotteries, scratchies and online betting, particular racing and sports.

Image_016

In 2010 approximately 70% of all Australian’s gambled in one way or another, from the one-off punt on the Melbourne Cup to the habitual problem gambler at the local TAB. Collectively we spent over $19 billion in 2008-09, with $12 billion of that on pokie machines alone.

Does Australia have a gambling problem?

The reality is Australia leads the developed world for gambling losses, averaging $1,279 per adult gambler in 2014, just edging out Singapore ($1,243) and well ahead of the U.S in third ($705). The average problem gambler loses $21,000 per year, with 115,000 Australians classified as ‘problem gamblers’. A further 280,000 Australians are thought to be at ‘moderate risk’, and on their way to potentially becoming problem gamblers.

Are pokies the biggest issue for problem gamblers?

Regular pokie players are incredibly vulnerable to addiction with one in six classified as a problem gambler. Surprisingly it’s those aged 18-24 who spend more on pokie machines than any other age group, and 90% of women who are deemed problem gamblers identify pokie machines as the cause of their addiction.

But it’s not surprising given the sheer volume of pokie machines in Australia. Despite coming 53rd in terms of population, Australia is way out in front when it comes to pokie machine numbers. One-fifth of the world’s pokie machines are in Australia, easily having more per head of capita than anywhere else on earth, including gambling Mecca’s such as Las Vegas and Macau.

While pokie machines account for 60-65% of all gambling revenue, most Australians don’t actually play them. Almost three-quarters of Australians claim not to play them in any given year, which is surprising given they account for 75-80% of all problem gamblers.

What is the impact of gambling on society in general?

There are two sides to every story. While the cost to individual gamblers can be extraordinarily high, and the impact to the Australian taxpayer was $4.7 billion in 2010, the gaming industry is also positive in many ways. For example:

  • State tax revenue from gambling is between 4% (WA) and 13% (Victoria) of total revenue, money needed for countless statewide services such as school, hospitals and infrastructure.
  • The online wagering and sports betting industry alone employs over 1,000 people, pays more than $100 million to the sport and racing industries in fees, and $100 million per year in taxes.
  • In 2009, hotels with gambling employed 70,000 people, clubs with gambling employed 60,000 people, and casinos employed 20,000 people.

Enforcing RSG legislation reduces the social impact of problem gambling

Only 15% of problem gamblers seek help, but as an employee in the gambling industry, one of your roles is to identify problem gamblers and help them to address their issues. By doing so you could be having an incredibly positive influence on their lives, and the lives of those around them.

The impact of problem gambling isn’t just felt by the gambler, but also by 5-10 other people in their lives. Problem gamblers are:

  • Six times more likely to be divorced than gamblers who don’t have a problem
  • Four times more likely to have a drinking problem
  • Four times more likely to be a daily smoker
  • Ten times more likely to have children who grow up to be problem gamblers

Studying an RSG online (SITHGAM201 – Provide responsible gambling services) course will provide you with the required skills and knowledge to recognise gambling issues  in individuals, and provide information to connect problem gamblers with gambling support services. The difference you make to a person’s life could be profound, even beyond what you may know or even realise.

Archives

  • January 2024
  • December 2023
  • November 2023
  • September 2023
  • August 2023
  • July 2023
  • June 2023
  • May 2023
  • April 2023
  • March 2023
  • February 2023
  • September 2022
  • July 2022
  • May 2022
  • April 2022
  • March 2022
  • February 2022
  • January 2022
  • December 2021
  • November 2021
  • October 2021
  • September 2021
  • August 2021
  • November 2020
  • October 2020
  • September 2020
  • August 2020
  • September 2016
  • August 2016
  • July 2016
  • June 2016
  • August 2013
  • July 2013
  • May 2013
  • April 2013
  • March 2013
  • February 2013
  • January 2013
  • December 2012
  • RSA Competency Check

    Have you completed an accredited RSA course previously?

    Do you hold any of the following?

    Current or Recently Expired NSW RSA Competency Card

    If you have a current Competency Card you cannot re-complete the course to renew it while it is current. This includes any learners in the 28 day renewal period or who have a current NSW RSA Competency Card endorsement but have not received their card.

    You can check if you have a Current Competency Card or endorsement here

    If you choose to continue you must declare below that you understand that your existing competency card endorsement(s) will not be renewed. By continuing you accept responsibility for providing correct and accurate information about your NSW RSA currency and understand that should you be found ineligible to undertake the course or renew your NSW RSA you may not be entitled to a refund.

    NSW RSA Interim Certificate issued within 5 years from the "Valid for duties date"

    If you have a current NSW RSA interim certificate issued within 5 years from the "Valid for duties" you cannot complete the NSW RSA course again. You must visit a Service NSW centre with your Interim Certificate to obtain your card.

    You can check if you have a Current Competency Card or endorsement here

    By continuing you accept responsibility for providing correct and accurate information about your NSW RSA currency, understanding that this will not renew your NSW RSA and that should you be found ineligible to undertake or renew your NSW RSA by completing the course you may not be entitled to a refund.

    Is your RSA current and issued by a Registered Training Organisation or a state/territory approved training organisation?

    Are you planning to reside permanently in NSW?

    You may be eligible to receive the NSW RSA by completing a bridging course

    If you wish to apply to Liquor & Gaming NSW to complete their RSA bridging course, please note that EOT cannot confirm if your interstate RSA will be accepted, and it is your responsibility to research and confirm you meet the eligibility requirements.

    You may be eligible to work temporarily in NSW using your current RSA

    If you wish to temporarily work in NSW under Automatic Mutual Recognition, please note that EOT cannot confirm if your interstate RSA is eligible, and it is your cresponsibility to research and confirm you meet the eligibility requirements before commencing work in NSW.